Sesame Tofu with Fresh Basil and Thai Sweet Chili Sauce

Ever wonder what to do with tofu? You're not alone. This is currently a crisis in America, and I'm here to help. I will not rest until every food eating citizen learns to love at least one tofu dish. Why do I care so much? Because this poor innocent food has been wrongly accused of being tasteless for far too long. And the reason it's often tasteless is poor preparation. No you can NOT just throw some plain tofu in some veggies and serve it on a plate. No, no, no. Tofu must be prepared with flavor-rich counterparts - otherwise it is indeed bland. Think of tofu as a neutral, passive food, just waiting for someone to tell it what to do. However, once it has direction, it goes along willingly, ready for any task.

Incidentally, tofu is high in nutrients like calcium and iron. Just be sure to buy organic tofu, as you can count on it being full of GMOs if it isn't. I've also heard tell of a new tofu on the market made from sprouted soybeans! This excites me. However, I haven't seen it in stores yet. But if you do, and you try it, please let me know what you think!

This little recipe is from Radiant Health, Inner Wealth and is a favorite amongst kids and adults both. Enjoy!




Sesame Tofu with Fresh Basil and Thai Sweet Chili Sauce

Here is a dish that is very easy to make, yet completely delicious and impressive! If you use both black and brown sesame seeds, it will look beautiful as well. You can serve this plain or alongside some rice or Asian noodles. This is also a hit with kids. The last time I served this to a group of children, I was asked: “How do you spell good dinner?”

1 lb. tofu, extra-firm (not silken)
½ cup “Thai Sweet Chili Sauce” (found in the Asian section of most supermarkets)

Flavor that Tofu:
1 teaspoon dried garlic granules
2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger
2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons tamari, shoyu, or soy sauce
2 tablespoons liquid vegetarian broth

Crispy Coating:
¾ cup sesame seeds (preferably a mixture of black and brown sesame seeds)
1 tablespoon dry cornmeal
2 tablespoons rice flour (or whole wheat pastry flour)

Pan-Frying: 3-4 tablespoons oil (sunflower, non-virgin olive, or coconut)

Garnish: 4 teaspoons fresh basil, minced or cut into thin ribbons

1. Cut the tofu into eight slabs. Press the tofu between paper towels to remove excess moisture for at least 30 minutes.
2. Flavor that tofu! Remove the tofu from the paper towels and cut it into triangles that are about two inches in size. Place the pieces in a single layer on a plate. Combine the garlic, ginger, and tamari. Pour this mixture over the tofu, turning the pieces to coat all sides with the marinade. When most of the liquid has been absorbed, pour the broth over the tofu to moisten it. This will help bind the coating to the tofu.
3. Place the seeds, cornmeal, and flour in a large plastic bag and shake well to combine.
4. In a large skillet or wok, heat the oil over medium-high heat.
5. Place several of the tofu triangles in the bag and gently shake to thoroughly coat the tofu with the breading. When the oil in the pan becomes hot, add the tofu in a single layer.
6. When the tofu pieces are golden brown and crisp on the bottom, turn them over. When both sides are golden and crisped, remove and allow them to drain on paper towels.
7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 until all of the tofu has been used up.
8. Distribute the tofu onto four plates. Shake or stir the chili sauce and drizzle it evenly over the tofu. Top each portion with one teaspoon of the fresh basil and serve immediately. One final note: Once you begin eating this dish, you may inadvertently begin cursing loudly to yourself due to the excessive yumminess present on your plate. Don’t be alarmed—this is a standard reaction and will subside when you’re done.

Serves 4; GF/Purple (according to the guidelines in Radiant Health, Inner Wealth)

10 comments:

  1. Tofu! It's what's for dinner! Excited to try this recipe today.

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  2. Nice blog. I followed your blog and please follow mine. Lets share ideas on health and wellness and also help our blog improve its traffic and search engine rankings.

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  3. Hi, I've had sprouted soybean tofu a few times. It's not a huge difference, but I like it just as much Plus it's likely easier to digest :)

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  4. To the delight of the fast food industry, quick food options have become engrained in the mind of the consumer as a choice between convenience and nutrition. For students and employed adults who don't have time to prepare meals, convenience inevitably wins out almost every time.

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  5. It's all about a good preparation! I think we can't avoid this kind of recipes. They are so delicious and everyone can support me, by the way, I will find the garlic granules and then I'll do my best to do the same recipe at home. 23jj

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  6. looks nice, got some tofu that i have no clue what todo with, and apparently to lazy todo a google search... might just give it a try now..

    and LoL at noah's generic reply, you little SEO you :)

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  7. Ha, I know, VH! "I love your blog, btw here is my link."
    I think you'll love this dish tho - even people who say they hate tofu dig it!

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  8. You were right! I loved it :) can I republish it on my site? wont take credit for the recipe just want to share nice things :D also might send a few people your way... that would be nice :)

    Also do you sell any of your books via The Book Depository.com

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  9. @Vegan Hippy: Thanks! So glad you enjoyed it!
    Yes, you are welcome to share this recipe on your site, thank you. Please just provide a link to my website & let folks know where you got the recipe. Thanks so much! :-)

    No, I don't think my books are on the Book Depository.

    ReplyDelete